Transcript of interview with Maurice Broughton

Transcript of interview with Maurice Broughton.                       6th November 2013

Present:  Maurice Broughton, Lorna Broughton.
                 M. Page , S Fuller, I Horsley, M. Campbell.
                 Part way through Kay(?) Broughton ( daughter ) arrived.

 

MB:

I started when I was 14 and worked with tractors all the time. Anything on the farm.  Can you see it / can you do it? (Referring to attempts to get the CD player to play the CD of the 1951 Barrow plough Jag play).

MC:

It’s only about half an hour long including the interviews. (The recording of the Barrow Plough jags singing “All jolly fellows” is heard MB joins in).

LB:

Oh, I’ve heard this so many times! (Laughter).

MP:

I drove my wife barmy! ( laughter)

MC:

Whilst they are singing through this I thought I’d just mention that our Morris Side now do a special celebration on Plough Monday. We try and keep the tradition of plough Monday alive and we are going to be doing an event in January at the Fulstow brewery in Louth where we will spend the whole evening focussing on the idea of Plough Monday including our chosen version of the plough play.

MB:

“In comes I tome fool “(in anticipation of the recording).

MP:

Aye, that him!

MC:

On a copy of one of the tapes there is a cast

MB:

“Neow” ( MB mimics the recorded sound of the Lincolnshire pronunciation of “now”)

MC:

3 members of the san family and 3 members of the bell family?

MB:

Oh yes. Luke Stanley was the hobby horse.

MC:

This is Maurice talking here (referring to the part of the “Farmers’ man”).

MB:

Aye, yes.

He’s still alive this one (referring to the person playing the “lady bright and gay”) – Norman - he’s 88 I think.

MC:

Very interesting voice he uses there

MB:

This is Jack martin ( referring to” Indian King”)

MP:

Who is the musician

MC:

Luke Stanley.

MB:

Son Billy used to play one as well.  Musical Jack.

MC:

And one of the people we bumped into when we were doing our performances of the play this year, we bumped into 3 people in barrow one of which was Mark Stanley, Luke’s Grandson. And he mentioned that his uncle Bill maybe still around?

MB:

Bills dead but toms still around. There’s myself Norman Bilton, Tom Stanley , I think that’s all that ‘s left.

MC:

Right… The other gentleman that sent me a copy of the tape who we (?) bumped into at another pub was a gentleman called err, Martin Freeman.  He was aware of their play and had a copy of the ,  the same copy of the performance which he sent to me. The lady who put us onto yourself,  Maurice,  was a lady called Jane Haddock. She worked as a school secretary?

MB:

In Barrow, yes. (?) His father…That’ll do ( referring to long dance)

MC:

Does go on a bit!

LB:

How many years did that go on?

MB:

1951 to (pause) 1962…

INH:

Were they dancing or just stamping their feet?

MB:

Dancing

MC:

For the recording purposes were they actually doing the dance? Or did they just…

MB:

Oh we were doing the dance.

SF:

So it was the cast members that were doing the dance were they?

MB:

Yes!

MC:

Did they have some people in the dance who were not actually in the play?

MB:

No, no, they were all in the play. (Another comment in audible)

MC:

Was it the sword that were in that book in the photograph. Were they wooden swords then?

MB:

Yes that right. Made em up into a square (inaudible)

MC:

Then make the lock at the end? And hold it up …

MB:

(Inaudible remark)  Couldn’t do it now anyhow!

MC:

When we do various versions of the plays... we try and revive each of eth village versions as we go through the years and we’ve done in all about a dozen different plays now over the years since we started doing plough plays and we are doing the Kirmington play this season. And, err , what we do , because we are a Morris side , right, we don’t actually do a sword dance, we do some version of what we do you know a short version of it to keep a dance tradition inside the play.

MB:

Come on! That’s enough ( laughter)

MC:

Unfortunately with it being a CD you can’t fast forward it. Oh there we are ( dance  ends)

MB:

“Now my lads!” ( pre-empting voice on CD)

MC:

Did he use that voice in the play then or just for this recording (Referring to the way the “Lady “ speaks).

MB:

In the play.

MB:

( referring to the song)  This is Luke singing.

MC:

How old would Luke have been at this time?

MB:

What when he was doing that – well he was retired

MC:

He would have been in his sixties then.

MP:

 I tell you what, he’s doing well!

MC:

Ian here is the one who plays our “lady” in the play.

Dame Jane is usually played by Mike (Dame Jane speaks on recording) here.

MB:

That’s Tom ( referring to person speaking on recording)

MP:

After all them years its spot on.

MC:

It’s one of the songs they sing at the Haxey Hood (ref “Farmer’s Boy being sung on recording).

MB:

Oh is it?

LB:

There’s some nice singing there.

MC:

 Yes.

Twelve in the cast, twelve people I the cast.

LB:

There was some nice singers among them

MB:

Ah there was talented. And at the end we get a sup!

MC:

Absolutely our tradition too.

MB:

This is Jack Martin ( referring to recording)

 

Long pause in conversation listening to the recording

MB:

If they didn’t give you any money or beer you could plough the door step up

MC:

Or the lawn

MB:

Aye, the lawn!

MC:

This is Richard Brown born in 1868 ( ref new person on recording)

MB:

He wasn’t in’t play though?

MC:

I don’t think so. Got a right Lincolnshire accent

MB:

“Crossed soowerds” (mimicking spoken “crossed sword” on tape).

MP:

Kerfuffle over front door being locked and  ? unable to get in !.

MC:

That’s it that’s the full recording – have you never heard that recording of Richard Brown before?

MB:

Talks like Luke Stanley dunt he.

MC:

It’s our received wisdom that’s who was talking, it was Richard Brown – you said he talks like Luke, that sort of accent.

LB:

Inaudible comment.

KB:

“In comes I Tom Fool “and all that?

MC:

He’s been joining in.

 

General call for teas with sugars/ milk etc.

LB:

Maurice had an operation on his eye and she’s been coming 4 times a day  (long discussion about  Maurice’s operation)

MP:

Just going back to that, that last conversation - that Richard Brown... did you know him?

MB:

No, if you hadn’t said, I would have said it was Luke Stanley.

MP:

Aye cos it does sound like Luke Stanley.

LB:

Who was Richard Brown?

MC:

He was 83 in 1951 and he sounds like he’s 83 as well doesn’t he.

LB:

83 in 1951.

MC:

Luke in those days was about 60

LB:

Only a young lad (Laughter)

MC:

He mentioned about dancing the bacca pipes dance – did you ever see that done?

MB:

No

MC:

Crossed bacca pipes, Lincolnshire tradition was that? Lincolnshire?

LB:

I seen it done across swords. Good how they did that must have been well trained to do it.

MP:

Did you often do the plough plays then or was it just a one-off?

MB:

No – we did for a good old 10 year I should say.

MC:

Doing it for about 10 years- Prior to this? What? Leading up to this performance?

MB:

I didn’t do anything before 1951 and then for about ten year after that.  We packed up ourselves because we doing, going to garden parties and things like that we could see people in the audience was   on with us – they knew it better than what we did

LB:

They’d seen it so many times they could repeat it backwards.

MB:

But Jack Martin he used to get mad  - cos he was tea total was Jack  Martin  don’t get (? Meaning drunk) tonight. But the more ale we got , better we was like (laughter)

MC:

This is all very familiar...  when we go out we tour round pubs. We do about 3 or 4 in an evening various pubs in North, North East Lincolnshire, some out Louth way and that sort of thing, so we do a tour, most of the tours are in the evening.  And we choose, generally speaking, pubs to go at because we like a little bit of a drink on the way. We see that as part of the tradition.

MB:

First thing when we got to a village “Where’s pub?”

MC:

That’s right.

LB:

I always thought when they say something queer and the audience is laughing, its hard work keeping a straight face.  I used to love it

MP:

Did you just used to do the plough play , you didn’t do anything else

MB:

No.

MP:

So you did the plough play all year round then?

MB:

Yes. Sometime garden parties on the lawn, or we’d do it in the village halls

MP:

And did you vary it or did you use the same one every year?

MB:

What, yes same play, same play.

LB:

That’s why I know it.  Cos when one missed out it was?

MP:

You wouldn’t have the prompt then would you.  It would just roll off the tongue!

MC:

We find that as well, we go to places, we do different versions of the play each year and we still find common phrases and items in the play (cups of tea arrive). We find when we are performing the play, members of the audience are repeating the words with us, it is familiar, and they do pick up on these things.

MP:

It happened to us last year in Barton didn’t it

MC:

Yes it did.

SEF:

Did you get very far afield with the play when you went out?

MB:

 Well, round Gainsborough way we’ve done,

MC:

Have you ever heard of the Scunthorpe plough jags?

MB:

No

LB:

Are they on the go now?

MC:

They are.  They have been going for about 40 years I think, they perform a version of the play that was drawn together it was one that was made kind of generic version of the play by drawing bits out of all the different versions of the play and there are some echoes of eth Barrow play in there as well abuts the bag pipes playing, they got that in the play. Drawn together by a chap called Maurice Ogg but now he died. He started it all those may years ago, and the team is still working.   Many changes of personnel over the years obviously erm and, err, Maurice because it was err drawn together from different plays, he lived in a village near to Coleby so it’s now called the Coleby Plough Jag.  They are keeping that tradition alive, in their way, and they go out once a year and do an all day tour into the evening. Whereas what we do is do a series (inaudible comments in background) we do a series of tours into different parts of the county doing 3 or 4 performances and we collect as we go along the way. For local charities.  The Scunthorpe team do but we collect for a different chosen charity each year. We choose a charity and all the funds that we collect goes to that charity.  This year we are going to do it for the Stroke Club which is based at Grimsby Hospital.

KB:

Do you actually do this then, what Dad did?

Many:

Yes but we don’t do the Barrow play.

KB:

Not the one that I hear dad say?

SEF:

Not but there’s lots of “family resemblances” though.

MC:

 A lot of the characters are the same

KB:

Like on the photograph? Do you dress like this?

MC:

Did we bring any photographs of us?

INH:

 Yes we have, I’ve got my little thing!

MC:

Ian is our archivist and he keeps all our archive records  ( Ian gets out photographs of GMM from  his dossier to show Kay)

All:

Discussion concerning the GMM Plough plays and the various photos, who plays which character etc.

MB:

Have you done the Barrow plough jags?

MC:

 We’d love to do the Barrow play but we’ve held off from doing it because we thought there was some reason why we weren’t able to or weren’t allowed to.  So we’d want to clarify that particular point.

MB:

Don’t think there’s any o Martin’s...

INH:

 We’ve got a thing here about it.

MP:

 We raise a lot of money for local charities.

INH:

Mike Gott tells us, he was a member in the late 70 and 80’s, and that refers to it ; there was a problem with (inaudible)

MP:

Every penny we collect goes to that charity  and it’s not just any charity , it’s local so it stays local  Last year we did L.I.V.E.S

MC:

 First response

MP:

First responders. (Other remarks about the charity are inaudible).

MB:

 We never made any money we never  charged any money

MC:

We were told there (inaudible)Mentions Peter Kennedy and some problems with the plough play members.

We were wondering if there was any group in Barrow that might like to revive the play.

INH:

Well, what I have been doing is making these booklets of Histories or “His Story”  and I’d like to compose one of what you are saying  and whatever else and then send on to you , to see if it’s right ,  with the history of the Barrow plough play  by Maurice Broughton. And the date. So you don’t have to write anything, I’ll do it and send it to you and see what you think to it. Just so there will be a copy of it and it will be there for ever more.  These little booklets that I do although they are only typed and  whatever, they are I the archive  in Grimsby, the archive in Lincoln,  the reference library in Grimsby  in Town Hall square and with eth English Folk and Dance Society in London.  So they are a constant reference (inaudible).

MC:

 So each time he makes a piece of work like this , he sends a copy of it to those archives to be put in for posterity you might say.  SO what Ian would like to do is compile a file, about the Barrow Play err your reminiscences  and would send that copy to you  for you to amend  or add to as you wish and then that could go into that  same archive

MB:

I don’t see any reason why Barrow people (?) couldn’t do it now.

MC:

I’ll give you a parallel, err, Maurice,  because at the em , Plough err Festival of the plough,  at high Burnham,  there was a team from Branston,  from the village of Branston , a drama club and they revived the Branston play ( remainder inaudible – multiple conversations in progress).

MP:

Going back to the plough play, because we don’t do the Plough play on Boxing day, we do the Plough Play on about 7 different occasions don’t we? About 7? Between the middle of December and it finishes  at Waes Hal which is round about the 19th January.  And we do a Waes Hal at Skidbrooke at the cyder mill at Skidbrooke, down by the coast, we do a proper ceremony.

LB:

 Well you are busy then!

MP:

Oh we’re always busy,

MC:

We have a year round programme because we dance in our Cotswold kit during the summer and then in our Boarder kit during the winter as well as doing these plough play tours. Keeps us busy, all year round basically. And between those phases we have to practice up what we are going to have to go out to perform. And our former Squire here , our former Squire here, is our foreman and he whips us into line

MP:

 Practice night is once a week, 2 hours, on a Monday night.

MB:

 Do you practice in a hall

?:

Yes, a church hall.

SEF:

So, how did you get involved in 1951 then? In 1951 how did you get involved in the Barrow plough play?

MB:

Well I don’t know. The whole gang would go to the pub in a night and we knew Jack M. Jack Martin and he asked us and that’s how it started.

SEF:

 It was just a group of friends

MB:

 Yes! We all went to school together like

MC:

 And one thing you all had in common was working on farms,

MB:

 We were all working on farms.

SEF:

 So what did people think about it or did you not know or care?

MB:

No we didn’t know what we letting ourselves in for at all.

LB:

You didn’t  care did you

MB:

 No well what were I, seventeen, and eighteen?

MP:

 Were you married then?

MB:

 No (invitation for more tea).  58 years this year.   Do you know where Barrow hall is? It’s still there now but it’s.... what do you call it (inaudible – laughter).

SEF:

Was the play well received then, right from the start did people enjoy watching it?

MB:

 Yes they did. Say, They used to ring up and say “Can you go so and so” We’d say “Is there a pub there?” (laughter) Used to get the bus and go.  We went to East Barkwith, d’you know East Barkwith?   We were there and we were doing 2 sessions, in the afternoon in the vicarage just like on the field, and we did it the lawn there and the bus what has brought us come home to Goxhill you see. . We were going to do it in the evening but it rained, of course, that were it. So we are stranded at East Barkwith, so there’s  nice little pub there. We got in there, the Landlord, sent his lad out said go fetch us some in we are having a ball (?) tonight. We had a racket in there that night, he put sandwiches on, (?) brought his accordion like a really great night that was.

LB:

 You had some good nights …

MB:

Aye, we never charged am, the only charge was some food, as long as we got food we were alright.

MP:

Is there anything that stuck out in your mind that happened to you or happened to the group?

MC:

 You know, like the story of the plough getting stuck in the Red Lion.

MB:

 When I was in the Barrow vicarage, we had to get changed in the garage, there was an air gun in the corner, I picked it up and had a look, I said “By that’s not been cleaned lately” so I cocked it and just pulled the trigger, and the pellet hit Norman Bilton “EH I’ve been shot, I’ve been shot” (laughter). Well it was lucky really, I never thought about it.

Just pulled the trigger!

MC:

 Attempted murder then?

MB:

It’s a good job I pointed it down there and not up!

MC:

 In one of our plays if the fight isn’t going very well for whoever is supposed to win, one of them nowadays draws a cap pistol and shoots them.  We use little tricks like that as part of our plot.  We tend to vary it each year.

SEF:

How often did you go out with the play then? Half a dozen times a year? Ten times a year?

MB:

Well yes, we used to start in summer time doing garden parties and keep on doing it through till winter.

LB:

 I think it’s nice to keep things like this going.

MB:

 AT Barnetby village hall when it used to be an old wood hut...

MC:

Where was that, sorry?

MB:

At Barnetby,  course, 3 or 4 of us had been for a pint as usual, and we come back and nature calls, so we went round  by the back of this shed like and di it like, goes in ,  and there it, all our pee, is running all across the floor … ( laughter).

KB:

That’s not one to remember!

LB:

 Trust you to remember something like that!

MP:

 Well you do don’t yer

LB:

He does!

KB:

I’ll go then, got to be off…

?:

Short but sweet, very nice indeed.

?:

Thank you for making tea dear

MB:

See you in the morning,

KB:

 I was going to come to see you tonight.

MB:

 Are you coming to do it?  Ah of course of course!

LB:

Are you taking us shopping tomorrow

KB:

 We’re going to the meeting aren’t we tonight.

MB:

Annual general meeting tonight, bowling club

LB:

 Are you going to that?

MB:

Aye. I’m chairman of Goxhill bowling club...

MC:

 Crown green bowling?

MB:

 Not Crown, flat,  at Goxhill.

LB:

How long you being down there? Years ent yer?

MB:

I’ve been a member of Goxhill bowling club since I were 14, I’m the oldest member.

KB:

Been chairman about 13 year I think

LB:

 I retired after 30 years as tea lady. When we was first courting I mean I didn’t bowls or (inaudible) and he said to me, we were all on a family outing, and he said to me “Do you go bowling?” (Something about having a go and missing the jack by miles and retiring from bowls at once!)

MC:

 He didn’t tell you about the bias on the bowl?

LB:

 Never told me a thing about it!

MB:

 We belong a t Grimsby- Carr Lane, Peoples park all them places play bowls.

MP:

 Have you spent all your working life on the farm?

MB:

No, no, no… when these 2 come along it got expensive (K leaves amid various goodbyes and farewell greetings). I was on the farm while National Service was going   in them days and if you stopped on a farm, you know you were exempt you see while you were 26.  I stopped while I was 26. Well I was married by then with 2 young lasses, and a farm wage then was what, three quid or something like that, and a local haulage firm at Goxhill, S. J. Barwick, you might have seen them, I went to pay a call on them and well, the told their wages was twice as much as I was earning, I got 3 quid a week that was all, mind I was in a tied house like, aye.  He said “My   drivers is earning twelve quid a week “   said it just off hand like that. Then I was told one Monday night the missus said , Mr Barwick he’s been to see you ,  would like to see you , so I went to see him  and he said ,” Did you mean what you said” and I said well I ‘ve got t’house to come out of and it’s a tied house and that’s it “  and he said,  “well I’ve been thinking  and there’s  2 cottages down North end, I might buy them “ he said  “would you come in wi me?” I said “Yes” But I said “I work for Mr Hargraves Like and I’d better see what he says. Any - how, I went off and I saw ‘im, he was them  bosses  (?) and I said “Am I  worth any more money to you Mr Hargraves ? “ Well”, he said “ Well no (?)  Have you got another job?”  I said “yes”  “Well, are you gonna better yourself?” “ Well yes”  “Well that’s alright then, off you go I don’t want to stand in your way if you want to better yourself”

“So that’s how I started with Barwicks and I were with them 40 year – truck driving”

LB:

 I went with him one particular time he was gone up to Scotland and he was going to pull into this particular place, switched the radio off and I looked back and he said “do you know what’s the stuff behind us?”  “ It’s that stuff  that blew up at Flixborough “  I went “ Oh my God …” (laughter)  

MB:

Had it all summer time from Stavely Chemical up to Grangemouth  - a load up and a load back. ( Chemical name inaudible)   Tupperware -  went to ICI at Grangemouth and they made Tupperware ….  Land’s End John O groats.

MC:

 All truck driving ?

MB:

 Yes..

 

Inaudible comments from various people.

MC:

Farming wise, you said you did all sorts on the farm?  Not just ploughing and...

MB:

 Everything  - mi Dad was farm foreman when I worked  ,well , where I lived  he was farm foreman,  he worked for Hargraves and he was farm foreman for 53 years.

MP:

You were with them, Hargraves? Where was that?

MB:

Low Farm between Go hill and Thornton, come to the first cross roads, you turn left to Grimsby, it’s on the right hand side.  His son has it now.  

LB:

Those were the days.

MC:

Is Norman, Norman Dawson  … Living locally  is he still alive?

MB:

Oh aye, still lives in Barra

LB:

How old will he be?

MB:

I think he’s 88

MC:

 Do you see anything of him now?

MB:

 The only time we see him is at Tesco’s at Barton, he goes with his wife - he ‘ain’t been very well though.

MC:

 88 is a good age !

LB:

 It catches up with yer dun’t it !

 

Inaudible comments from various people.

MB:

Well, me, I’m 81 but you know  I cut the grass

LB:

 I’m 5 years older than him, I’m 88 April the first

 

Inaudible comments from various people.

LB:

 When you’ve been active and you come to a full stop it’s hard work.

MC:

Do you cut your back hedge then Maurice ?

MB:

No, No- I used to do

LB:

 We used to have all shrubs along here .. but we were having the roof redone before Christmas so he’s had to move all his flowers out the way

MB:

 Well, I asked a bloke , he did 2 or 3 roofs down here and he was recommended , so when he comes he’s a one man band from Immingham  and he come and he got us a good price, said see you in June but he messed us about and messed us about,  and any how  last week, rung him up “ Well” he said “It’s getting a bit late now” Isez, “Look,”  and he said “ The days is short , and it’s dark at nights”  and all these excuses,  I said “Look I come to you in June  and you said you’d do it by August”  So I said “Dunt bother”  So I’ll get sumbdy else ..

LB:

Don’t think he had any intention of coming. I’m sure he hadn’t.

MB:

 A firm at Scunthorpe, he come and he said “Well (Inaudible) Same as that, can you see across there? (various acknowledgements ) see gully going down is leaking on this one, I want to do it before we get any snow.

MP:

We shall have a lovely hot winter!

 

Various banter about weather.

MB:

 Keep saying we are going to have a bad winter  well they got that storm right last week or week before.  That one down South.

MC:

It sort of petered out by the time it got to us.

LB:

I don’t understand where all our birds have gone it used. how many did you count one time? Was it 30?

MB:

All them bird feeders on there , I’ve had 32 Goldfinches on there , this year we’ve had 2 and they’ve disappeared,  There used to a Robin, 9 or 10 blackbirds

LB:

 All of them has gone.

MP:

Do you have a lot of magpies round here?

MB:

Not many, no I’ve not seen ‘em. But there’s a lot of food out there on the hedges

LB:

 Whether they will come more in the colder weather... Aye they were a picture when all that lot used to come. Really pretty birds.

MP:

 Err , the goldfinches have had a pasting this year ,  they got an, err um virus, that has affected their breathing

LB:

Maurice took a photograph of me down here on a chair with a blackbird, he used to come right up to me, and it would peck right out of my hand.  It were very, very tame.

MB:

One other snag, we’re ‘fested wi’ cats (various interjections about cats) there’s one house has 5 cats ( further discussion about cats in the garden).

INH:

 Stupid birds attracting these cats ( laughter)

MP:

 It’s been smashing talking to you...

MC:

Quite an experience.

 

Inaudible.

INH:

 As we were saying earlier , perhaps we could get somebody else of the local people to do the Barrow play,

MB:

Yes

INH:

Next year, January, February, March we are having a big exhibition in the museum of Lincolnshire Life in Lincoln, depicting other plough plays and hoping that the local Parishes and different local drama groups and things will come and see it and take it on as well. So we can do a feature on the Barrow plough Play there

MC:

 Then in 2015 we are doing an assembly of all the plays aren’t we?

INH:

 Yes, yes.

MC:

What we are doing … To follow on from what Ian is saying,  in 2015, we are going to have an event where we are hoping  to invite all the plough teams , plough play teams , to come  to perform their particular play. This was done back in 198? At Riseholme there was a similar sort of event where teams from various part of Lincolnshire came to that, err, agricultural college at  Riseholme,  and performed their versions of the play.  It was a very interesting experience. We want to do something similar to encourage more of the villages that have got their versions of the play to come along to it.

INH:

 And a sort of permanent and photographic scripts type exhibition for 2 or 3 moths.

 

Inaudible.

MB:

I’ll ‘ave a word wi Norman .. (various inaudible interjections)  I’m too old for all that now

INH:

 I wouldn’t expect you to do any plough , any playing  

MC:

 But what we are saying is that we would like to get teams  (inaudible) and make a feature of it there

MP:

 You know we were on about Scunthorpe plough jags,  earlier… Martin, plays one of the characters, you know in the play.  They do it on only one day; they don’t do it any other day.

MC:

 What they call Plough Jag Saturday.  Or, Plough Saturday,  they start at about eleven O’clock in the morning at Gainsborough,  and the do a tour, they do a tour all the way through the day and into the evening , they finish late in the evening on Saturday night at , erm  Burton on Stather  to finish at Burton on Stather at the ferry house, that’s right

INH:

 I’ll just give you that, that’s about our boxing day tour, I was fumbling to find it earlier, but there it is.

 

 

INH:

 I’ll be corresponding with you anyway about your  History , that’s my name and phone number

MB:

 ‘Ave you got my number?

MC:

 Yes we have got your number.  I have it on my notes here.

 

Telephone numbers are exchanged.

INH:

 I’ll write to you then I’ll get it back again. That will be within a week or ten days I would think.

MB:

 You got me address?

MC:

We have indeed

 

 

MP:

 We’ve brought these, it’s only something small , it’s to do with us, our group,  Grimsby Morris Dancers,  when you next have your cup of tea,  and you put it on your coaster,  you will be able to put it on one of these ( hands over Stanleys Boaring Bitter beat coasters) right.  One for you and one for Maurice

LB:

 Ooh, well in’t that lovely! Thank you.

MC:

Thank you.

MP:

 And that, was celebrating out fortieth anniversary which was in 2007. And the brewer at Fugglestow Brewery , micro-brewery, he did that brew  and we named it  “Stanley’s Boaring Bitter “and this is what the pump clip was made of.  And we a had a load of em made specially as coasters as keepsakes. So there’s one for you and one for Maurice.  Just to remember, just to remember our visit by.

LB:

 Thank you very much indeed.

INH:

 The Boar’s head is the symbol of Grimsby, there’s 3 boar’s heads and a chevron. And in eth early  fifteen hundred, late  fourteen hundreds,  they used to bring Boars from Bradley woods into town,  and the Morris Men would be part of the parade to bring it in.

MC:

 So we sort of adopted it.  Each Morris Side, most Morris Sides have an animal character, as part of their team and ours is our Boar. B O A R , right , Stanley we call him,  because eth person who started Grimsby Morris Dancing in this country, town in Grimsby was a  man  called Stan Compton  so we named our hobby boar or animal , after Stan , he’s called Stanley,  so we called it Stanley’s BOARING bitter,  B O A R – Stanley’s Boaring Bitter, that explains what the name is about

LB:

 We couldn’t drink it nowadays cos we are both diabetic.

 

Multiple discussions about sticky drinks coasters , medicinal whisky,  drinks from whiff waffs poured down tif taffs and then the recording ends.